Center for Art Law

At the crossroads of visual arts and the law.

UNESCO Convention Turns 50

Half a Century of Fighting Illicit Trafficking of Cultural Property This year, the 1970 UNESCO Convention quietly turned 50. The 1995 UNIDROIT Convention that supplemented the 1970 Convention with private law relating to the international trade of art turned 25. While the in-person celebrations and conference did not happen, efforts to prevent the traffic in cultural property have been ongoing. Investigations, prosecutions and trainings of law enforcement, customs and court officers continue as do the efforts to circumvent national patrimony laws and introduce illicit exported objects into the stream of commerce. Join the Center for Art Law for a conversation a

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From copyright and contract law to immigration law, authenticity issues, and Nazi-era looted art, the Center for Art Law offers training opportunities to artists, attorneys, students, and scholars to further protect art and cultural heritage

The Center for Art Law is a New York State non-profit fully qualified under provision 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. The Center does not provide legal representation. Information available on this website is purely for education purposes and should not be construed as legal advice.
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