Center for Art Law

At the crossroads of visual arts and the law.

Hiding in Plain Sight

What’s in a name? Art dealers and attorneys are on standby to help answer the question collectors and the general public have about the attribution of art. As art’s attribution changes so does its market value. Connaisseurs who stay alert at auction may enjoy the good fortune of catching a work of art that is misattributed. Who knows, maybe over a course of a decade the market value of such a rare find could grow tenfold, or even increase from $10,000 hammer price to $400 million.  If that rings a bell, join the Center for Art Law for a discussion on the sales of misattributed artworks at auction and the fascinating story of Salvador Mundi, the painting that set the world

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From copyright and contract law to immigration law, authenticity issues, and Nazi-era looted art, the Center for Art Law offers training opportunities to artists, attorneys, students, and scholars to further protect art and cultural heritage

The Center for Art Law is a New York State non-profit fully qualified under provision 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. The Center does not provide legal representation. Information available on this website is purely for education purposes and should not be construed as legal advice.
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